9 questions millennial entrepreneurs need to ask themselves before introducing their brand or business to the world

when it comes to social media, everybody has the power. the power to persuade, the power to inform, the power to debate and the power to sell and these days… everybody is selling something and everyone wants you to endorse them on your own personal pages. now don’t get me wrong, i’m glad that more millennials are out there embracing the entrepreneurial spirit. however (comma) the executions for these entrepreneurial ideas haven’t been all that great and at the end of the day, nobody is gonna support a product that isn’t presented in a way that resonates with them, ya know? if you’ve already got your ish in order, great. but If you’re trying to position yourself and your brand in the best possible before you present it for the world to see, consider the following:

9). what is the name of your brand?

the name of your brand can make or break you, literally. when you’re thinking of a name, you want to pick one that’s creative, appropriate, easily marketable and most importantly, a name that aligns with the service you provide.  so basically, don’t tweak.

8). what does your logo look like? 

when it comes to your logo— you definitely want that to be something of quality. i mean… it’s literally the first thing people will see when you put your brand out there. and these days, most humans have an attention span of about 8 seconds (if that). so, your logo has a lot of work to do in a very short amount of time. you want to be sure that is sticks out for good reasons, not bad. this isn’t the time to use your friend who has “some” creative talent just because ya’ll go way back. don’t be cheap about it. you may think you’re saving money by using the homie, but you’ll end up losing it in the long run when nobody wants to support a brand that has a horrible logo.

7). did you check your spelling before you post something on behalf of your brand?

this one is simple— proofread. one thing i really can’t get behind is a brand that can't spell. you should never be in that much of a rush where you can’t look over what you’re saying because once it’s out there, you can’t get it back. 

6). are you using quality photos to promote yourself?

“i grew up with them” is not an excuse to use someone for their services when it comes to your brand. if you need photos done (which you most likely will), use someone who’s gonna depict your products in the best way. if that happens to be someone you know, great. if it’s not— hey, it’s like that sometimes. and i’m not just talking about pictures on your website; you need to be mindful of the quality of pics you’re using on your social media pages too. using pictures that look like they were shot on the block with cousin pooh is probably not the best route to go, just sayin’. and brand placement is really important too. you don't want your brand/product pictured in areas that are unfavorable to the service or product you provide.

5). how is your social media presence?

what types of things are you liking on instagram from your brand’s page? what type of comments are being left on pictures you post on facebook? what was the last thing you tweeted from your brand’s page? all of these things are critical to your overall brand image. and don’t think that just because you liked/commented from your personal page that people won’t make the connection with your business page because they will. simply put, watch what you post online. period.

4). what does your website look like?

can’t speak for everyone but if the site looks sketchy, i'm closing out of the browser immediately and clearing my website history. i mean… all bias aside...would you support someone with a website that looked like trash? probably not. and you don't have to spend an arm, leg and two toes on a site, either. everyone doesn't need a web developer or coder for their site. some of ya'll just need a nice, clean template and that'll get the job done. and while we're on the subject of websites, buy your domain name.....buy yourrr domain name.......buyyyyyyyy youuuuurrrrrr dooommmmaaaaiinnnnn name. stop settling for "organizationname.webhostname.com" and get you a "organizationname.com, organizationname.net, etc. because not doing so doesn't make you fiscally responsible. it makes you hella cheap. and it shows you aren't really invested in how your brand looks on the receiving end. 

3). do you interact with customers professionally?

you really can’t afford to not be professional with your customers because the customer’s experience is everything. as customers, we all know how this goes: if we have a pleasant experience at a store or restaurant, we’re more likely to go back and patronize them again. but if we don’t have a good experience, we will go toe to toe with them until we get something for free (even if we were the ones that tweaked). but even with all of that, don’t be one of those brands that stoops down to the level of a customer that tried you. keeping it professional is the best way to go.

2). are you consistent?

you gotta be consistent. entrepreneurship isn’t something you should pick up and put down when you feel like it. once you put yourself out there, you’re out there. that means you gotta be on it at all times; you have to stick with it. consistency builds trust and if your customers can’t trust you, they most likely won’t purchase from you. 

1). if you didn’t know you, would you support you?

sometimes, it’s easy to get so wrapped up in your own thing that you aren’t able to look at your brand or business objectively. but you always want to take a step back and ask yourself, “if i weren’t me, would i support me?” if you’re honest about it, you’ll end up giving yourself the feedback you need to make beneficial changes. and if you’re having a hard time deciphering, ask someone else in your tribe. that’s what true friends are for -- not to tell you want you want to hear, but what you need to hear.